Commuting and Work

What do you know about Commuting and Work in Zambia? All you need to know about employee travel expenses, reimburse travel expenses, mileage allowance, commuting compensation in Zambia

What is commuting?

To commute is to travel between an employee’s area of residence and place of work on a regular basis. Workers may commute to work using various modes of transport. Others opt to use public transport like minibuses while others go for bicycles, private automobiles, motorcycles or simply walk.

Can I be paid to commute to work?

Yes and no, depending on the conditions of your employment contract. According to the law, you can only be paid if your place of work is beyond a radius of three kilometres (3km) from the area of your residence and no transport is provided. Your employer is compelled by law to pay you a monthly Transport Allowance. However, you will not be paid to commute to work if your employer is providing transport to and from work.

What if I have to travel really far to get to work?

Distance does not matter because the monthly Transport Allowance set out by the law is fixed. There is no difference for workers commuting to work for three kilometres or 15 kilometers. The only consolation is at the discretion of your employers because they might consider paying you a slightly higher fee than the one prescribed by the law.

Can I be reimbursed if I use my own money to commute to work?

No. The law does not make any provision for reimbursement of workers who use their own money or personal transport to commute to work. Some employers might consider reimbursing you if the cost incurred is part of conducting company business. More generous employers might consider subsiding fuel costs if you use your private automobile or motor bike to work, although they are not obliged to do so.

What if I have to work outside my usual place of work?

Your employer is supposed to pay you a Repatriation Allowance (consisting of minimum out-of-station and meal allowances), determined by your employer. The law only supports workers who have been transferred to work at a different station for longer periods. Under such circumstances, your employer is by law supposed to provide you with transport to and from that location of work.

 

To commute is to travel between an employee’s area of residence and place of work on a regular basis. Workers may commute to work using various modes of transport. Others opt to use public transport like minibuses while others go for bicycles, private automobiles, motorcycles or simply walk.

Can I be paid to commute to work?

Yes and no, depending on the conditions of your employment contract. According to the law, you can only be paid if your place of work is beyond a radius of three kilometres (3km) from the area of your residence and no transport is provided. Your employer is compelled by law to pay you a monthly Transport Allowance. However, you will not be paid to commute to work if your employer is providing transport to and from work.

What if I have to travel really far to get to work?

Distance does not matter because the monthly Transport Allowance set out by the law is fixed. There is no difference for workers commuting to work for three kilometres or 15 kilometers. The only consolation is at the discretion of your employers because they might consider paying you a slightly higher fee than the one prescribed by the law.

Can I be reimbursed if I use my own money to commute to work?

No. The law does not make any provision for reimbursement of workers who use their own money or personal transport to commute to work. Some employers might consider reimbursing you if the cost incurred is part of conducting company business. More generous employers might consider subsiding fuel costs if you use your private automobile or motor bike to work, although they are not obliged to do so.

What if I have to work outside my usual place of work?

Your employer is supposed to pay you a Repatriation Allowance (consisting of minimum out-of-station and meal allowances), determined by your employer. The law only supports workers who have been transferred to work at a different station for longer periods. Under such circumstances, your employer is by law supposed to provide you with transport to and from that location of work.

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