Forced Labor

Prohibition on Forced and Compulsory Labor

Forced Labour, slavery and slave trade are prohibited under the Constitution. No person can be required to perform forced or compulsory labour except as a penalty upon conviction by a competent court of law. In accordance with the provisions of Penal Code, whoever, unlawfully compels any person to labour against the will of that person, commits an offence, and upon conviction, is sentenced to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years or with a fine or with both. Whoever kidnaps or abducts any person with intent that such person may be unlawfully compelled to labour against his or her will commits an offence, and upon conviction, is sentenced to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years or with a fine or with both.

 

Source: §13 of the Transitional Constitution of South Sudan, 2011; §277-279 of the Penal Code Act 2008

Freedom to Change Jobs and Right to Quit

Workers have the right to change jobs after serving due notice to their employer. For more information, please refer to the section on employment security.

Inhumane Working Conditions

Working time may be extended beyond normal working hours of forty eight hours per week and eight hours a day. In the case of emergency, an employer may require a worker to perform overtime however the overtime hours may not exceed 4 hours per day and 12 hours per week. The overtime is optional in call cases for women.

 

Sources: §43 & 44 of Labour Bill, 2011

Regulations on Forced Labor

  • Labour Code, 1997
  • The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011
  • The Penal Code Act, 2008
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